Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Christian Realignment


I haven't posted much on Pope Benedict XVI's important Apostolic Constitution viz. Anglican converts to the Roman Church. So, to make up for the deficiency here's an article by William Lind, from the American Conservative. He writes about the realignment of Christianity across jurisdictional lines, amongst other things - I think it's excellent:

"Their (Frankfort Marxists/Gramscians) driving force is political ideology, not theology. They view the church as just one more venue for radical politics.

Their goal is Nietzsche’s “transvaluation of all values,” where the old sins become virtues and the old virtues, sins. In churches where they take power, the Holy Trinity is replaced by a trio of bogeymen: racism, sexism, and homophobia. Every denomination so afflicted is bitterly split between remaining Christians and the politically correct. (No, you can’t be both, as Marxists would agree.)

What is now happening, and what Rome may have discerned, is that the people on each side of this division find they have more in common with those in other denominations who share their basic faith, Christianity or cultural Marxism, than with the people on the other side of that divide within their own churches. A potential is emerging for a vast realignment, one transcending the divisions that came out of the Reformation. That realignment, in which the remaining Christians in every church would gather in a single, new (small “c”) catholic church, needs a leader. Who better than Rome? Indeed, who other than Rome could possibly pull it off?

Seen in that light, the Pope’s offer to the Anglicans takes on broader meaning..."

Read the whole thing here - well worth the effort.On another theme, you might like SBW's plea for commonsense thrift and less waste, Freeganomics.

Cheers,

LSP

14 comments:

Silverfiddle said...

I went and read the article. Interesting. I don't see many American denominations feeling the need to rejoin with Rome.

Especially the non-denominational evangelical movements. Some (Southern Baptists, Pentecostals) are downright hostile to Catholicism (the whole Whore of Babylon thing).

Papal infallibility is a hurdle, but what about belief in the real presence? That is a high hurdle for a life-long protestant to get over. The Schism with the Eastern Churches was over a very narrow theological issue, the subtlety of which would escape the vast majority of churchgoing Christians in this country.

I just don't know...

You've been featuring kooky Catholic priests lately, so it seemed like you were leaning against...

Teresa said...

I haven't heard much lately from the Pope on this matter. I know that the Catholic Church has veered off into liberalism and/or Marxism but I don't know much with regards to the political atmosphere of Anglicans. I have to admit I have become a disillusioned Catholic and am now looking into attending a Marionite Church - Pre- Vatican II liturgy.

I will definitely check out that article.

LSP said...

Good points and, I think, a good piece by Lind. You're right about the various protestant sects but I'd say there's a broader movement in play, namely Papal/Roman leadership of doctrinal Christianity.

That's a little, only just, over the horizon here in the U.S., but looked at globally is the only answer to militant secularism & the jihadists - witness B16 being the only Christian leader with the stature to address the U.N. etc. But we should expect this given Petrine succession.

The East recognises this too - see the latest detente between Rome & Moscow. But how such a thing plays out in practice is another matter and, with you, 'I just don't know.'

Not leaning against, I thought Fr. Furnes very irenic - unlike the wicked pelosian Boy Bishop. But I do believe Anglican Orders/Sacraments are valid, except when they're not...

LSP said...

Teresa - don't blame you for checking out the Maronites at all. Authentic liturgy is hugely important - fortunately B16 sees this, even if more than a few of his North American bishops don't...

Barking Spider said...

The Anglican Church in the UK has been so weakened and corrupted by that Lefty old hippie in the picture, Labour's favourite Archbishop, it's no wonder that people are leaving in droves, LSP. Williams should never have been installed in the post.

Silverfiddle said...

LSP: So The Vatican would be to global Christianity what the Academia Real is to world wide castilian Spanish?

Intriguing idea, but it would require the Vatican to resist the very Latin urge to file everything down to the finest point possible, or to tolerate those who don't.

I'm not against it, I'm just throwing some issues out to hear your reaction since you are way more up on this than I am.

And I must add that the entire Catholic church has not gone over to the unhinged Marxists. In a church so large you will have your loonies (Father Plfieger, the serial impregnator in Uruguay). The church does a pretty good job going after them when they pop up.

My biggest issue is the apparent complete support for unbridled immigration.

Yes, I understand we must protect everyone's human rights, but that is not inconsistent with enforcing our border and immigration laws.

Interesting stuff!

LSP said...

Spider - Rowan is a disaster; too bad to see the COE imploding into Harriet Harmonism.

LSP said...

Silverfiddle - I like the Spain point, interesting and I'd say 'resist the Latin urge' is right. Likewise, how Papal primacy would work in practice is unclear - while the broad principle seems pretty much agreed on, both by the Eastern and - for what its worth - Anglican Churches.

But perhaps that's academic. Its becoming increasingly apparent that Rome is the only force with sufficient doctrinal coherence and critical mass capable of standing up to Western secularism - and the 'gaping nullity' (thank you Steyn)it leaves in its wake.

Moscow certainly realises this - hence recent decisions to make common cause in Europe on ethical issues. Anglicanism, on the other hand, is so busy reducing its carbon footprint that it faces extinction...

We must thank God that the Magisterium wasn't infected wholesale with the same disease - even if the LIbs did manage to almost wreck the Roman liturgy. Thankfully that seems to be back in better hands recently.

Surely the immigration thing is simply a numbers game? And, you know, at least it isn't Islamic...

Silverfiddle said...

Doctrinal Coherence, indeed. That is what convinced me to convert to Catholicism (that and the mom of the Latin American cutie I married would have keeled over if she married a non-Catholic!)

I'm not as worked up over immigration from Latin America as many fellow conservatives are, but I with the church would take a more balanced view. And I hate to admit it, but I think you're right, it is a numbers game.

And your observation that they are much preferable to Europe's muzzie wuzzie problem hits the bulls eye. Living in Texas you see first hand how easily subsequent generations of Hispanic immigrant assimilate.

LSP said...

For sure - we should thank God that Mexico isn't Jihadist...

Snarky Basterd said...

I REFUSE to leave the Catholic faith ... I fight as much against the liberal sh*tf%&ks among us as I do against the Obama maniacs. I have a warming feeling that as support for Obamacraziness disipates, so does liberal inroads into Catholicism. I can't ever believe that a religion based on life could ever go all the way in bed with the religion of death ... that is liberalism.

LSP said...

Thanks Snarky - you mustn't leave the Catholic Faith, it's synonymous with Christianity. And I agree with you, it can't go over to the dark side.

What I'm working on, along with the diocese of Fort Worth and others, is salvaging catholicism from the wreck of contemporary Anglicanism - I know, it's an arcane struggle but, 'swords about the Faith' as Chesterton used to say.

Fausty said...

If, in the constitutions of the most powerful nation states, the only power above the individual is God, then it is plain to see why TPTB are keen to diminish religion.

Dangerous times.

LSP said...

Fausty - that, to my mind, is a very good comment. Dangerous times indeed.